Russell Wilson Limited by High Ankle Sprain

Not even Super Bowl champs are invincible Just ask Seattle Seahawks Quarterback, Russell Wilson. After suffering from a high ankle sprain last week against the Miami Dolphins, Wilson underwent intensive treatment in preparation for this weekend’s game against the Los Angeles Rams. Unfortunately, that wasn’t enough as evident by his limited mobility in today’s game. This posed a major problem for a player who relies heavily on his ability to run around. His team ultimately ended up losing 3-9 this past Sunday.

A high ankle sprain refers to a type of sprain that affects the high ankle ligaments or the syndesmosis. The syndesmosis is the major structure that holds the tibia and fibula together. One can typically still be able to walk around after sustaining this kind of injury however any external rotation or outwards movement of your foot can cause debilitating pain in the ankle that radiates up the leg.

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important to have it assessed by a trained foot and ankle specialist. In severe cases, the initial trauma can travel up the leg and cause a fracture. Long term, it can cause ankle instability and arthritis without proper treatment. X-rays can rule out any broken bones however a thorough physical exam by your doctor is the best way diagnose a high ankle sprain.

It usually takes athletes upwards of 6 weeks to fully recover so it is not surprising to see Russell Wilson struggle after just one week of physical therapy. Other treatment modalities that are commonly used include immobilization in a protective boot as well as resting and icing. In rare cases, surgery is required.

Although most of us are not lacing it up on Sundays, we still have to perform our daily duties whether it’s going to work or picking up the kids. Ankle pain is not normal. Call us at (813) 875-0555 to make an appointment to see our specialists today.

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